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I ain't marching any more

  • (Phil Ochs)

    I marched to the battle of New Orleans
    At the end of the early British wars
    The young men started growing
    The young blood started flowing
    But I ain't marchin' any more

    For I killed my share of Indians in a thousand different fights
    I was there at the Little Big Horn
    I heard many men a-lying
    I saw many more a-dying
    But I ain't marchin' any more

    It's always the old who lead us to the wars
    Always the young to fall
    Now look at what we've won with our sabre and our gun
    Tell me is it worth it all

    For I stole California from the Mexican land
    Fought in the bloody Civil War
    Yes, I even killed my brothers
    And so many others
    But I ain't marchin' any more

    For I marched to the battles of the German trench
    In a war that was bound to end all wars
    Oh I must have killed a million men
    And now they want me back again
    But I ain't marchin' any more

    It's always the old who lead us to the wars
    Always the young to fall
    Now look at what we've won with our sabre and our gun
    Tell me is it worth it all

    For I flew the final mission in the Japanese sky
    Set off the mighty mushroom roar
    When I saw the cities burnin'
    I knew that I was learnin'
    That I ain't marchin' any more

    Now the labour leaders screaming when they close a missile plant
    United Fruit screams at the Cuban shore
    Call it peace or call it treason
    Call it love or call it reason
    But I ain't marchin' any more

    I ain't marchin' any more

Susannes Folksong-Notizen

  • [1978:] [General Sir Edward Pakenham] played a less happy role in the battle of New Orleans in 1815, when he led eight thousand British troops in a frontal assault against the American earthworks, in what Winston Churchill called 'one of the most unintelligent manoeuvres in the history of British warfare'. The battle was brief and bloody [...]. It was not only a disastrous defeat but arguably a pointless one, since, unknown to the protagonists (the leader of the other side was Andrew Jackson, the future President of the United States), peace between England and America had already been signed. (Craig, Longford 20)

  •   [1979:] Einen hohen Stellenwert hatten im Programm von Ochs die Anti-Kriegs-Lieder. Sein bekanntestes, das im Verlauf der Jahre zu DER Anti-Vietnam-Kriegshymne wurde, war [dieses]. Es ist vergleichbar mit Dylans Masters of War. 1965 schrieb Ochs zu diesem Lied: "Dies grenzt sowohl an Pazifismus als auch an Verrat und verbindet die besten Merkmale von beiden miteinander. Die Tatsache, daß man dieses Lied nicht im Radio hören wird, ist mehr als Grund genug dafür, daß es geschrieben wurde." (Gerd Schinkel, Folk Michel 12)

  •   [1997:] Most of the historical events referenced in this song are probably pretty obvious, with the possible exception of "United Fruit." Further information can be found in the notes to the song United Fruit. (www.cs.pdx.edu/~trent/ochs, 21 Apr)

Quelle: USA

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aktualisiert am 19.04.2000