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I Am A Miller

  • (Trad)

    I am a miller tae my trade and that sae weel ye ken oh
    I am a miller tae my trade and that sae weel ye ken oh
    I am a miller tae my trade, and mony's the sack o' meal I've made
    And mony's the lassie I hae laid at the back o' the sacks o' meal oh

    It happened ae nicht in June when I was in my cell oh
    It happened ae nicht in June when I was in my cell oh
    It happened ae nicht in June, a lassie cam' trippin' doon the lane
    I thocht that I would just look in tae see if you're in yoursel' oh

    You're welcome here my bonnie lass, sae welcome here for aye oh
    You're welcome here my bonnie lass, sae welcome here for aye oh
    You're welcome here my bonnie lass, and what's the news that I maun hear
    Gin ye'll consent tae bide wi' me and bide wi' me for aye oh

    The larkin' lassie gie'd a smile, said she couldnae tell oh
    The larkin' lassie gie'd a smile, said she couldnae tell oh
    The larkin' lassie gie'd a smile, Young man ye'll hae tae wait awhile
    When you hear the mill a-clatterin' in ye'll hae me tae yoursel' oh

    I kissed her lips as sweet as honey, sweet as honey-dew oh
    I kissed her lips as sweet as honey, sweet as honey-dew oh
    I kissed her lips as sweet as honey, until a tear cam' in her e'e
    I'd leave my mammy a' for thee and be your ain for aye oh

    As merrily as the wheel goes round the rate sae weel ye ken oh
    As merrily as the wheel goes round the rate sae weel ye ken oh
    As merrily as the wheel goes round with grinding peas and corn oh
    A better job was never foond since ever I was born oh

    Repeat 1

    (as sung by Hamish Imlach)

Susannes Folksong-Notizen

  • [1961:] The miller with his grinding stones has long been an erotic figure in European folklore. He is celebrated in songs in French, Italian and Spanish, and Chaucer makes him the comic hero of The Reeve's Tale. [...] The tune is related to Johnny Comes Marching Home, Paddy Works On the Railroad, The Jolly Miller and many others. (Peter Kennedy, notes 'Jack of All Trades', The Folk Songs of Britain, vol 3)

    [1966:] From the singing of Lucy Stewart of Fetterangus. It is usually sung to a system of hand-beating which exactly imitates the knock and rock of the mill wheel. (Norman Buchan, notes 'The Fisher Family')

    [1978:] A typical erotic ballad from the North-East of Scotland, using the sexual imagery of the grinding of mill, stones and miller. (Notes Iain MacKintosh & Hamish Imlach, 'A Man's A Man')

Quelle: Scotland

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Henry
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aktualisiert am 30.05.2000