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The Bantry Girls' Lament

  • (Trad)

    For Johnny, lovely Johnny, he's a-sailing o'er the main
    He's along with other patriarchs to fight the king of Spain

    And who will plough the fields now and who will sell the corn
    And who will watch the sheep now and keep them neatly shorn
    And the stack that's in the haggard, unthreshed it may remain
    Since Johnny went a-threshing all in the wars of Spain

    And the girls from the Bawnoge in sorrow may retire
    And the piper and his bellows go home and blow his fire
    For Johnny, lovely Johnny, he's a-sailing o'er the main
    He's along with other patriarchs to fight the king of Spain

    And the boys will surely miss him when Moneymore comes round
    And they grieve that their brave captain is nowhere to be found
    And the Peelers must stand idle against their will and grain
    For the gallant boy who gave them work now peels the king of Spain

    And at wakes or hurling matches your likes we'll seldom see
    Till you'll come home again to us, a stóirin gheal mo chroí
    And won't you trouble the Buckeens who show us great disdain
    Because our eyes are not as bright as those you'll meet in Spain

    And if cruel fate does not permit our Johnny to return
    His heavy loss we Bantry girls will never cease to mourn
    We'll resign ourselves to our sad loss and we'll die in grief and pain
    Since Johnny died for freedom's sake in the foreign land of Spain

    (as sung by Jimmy Crowley)

Susannes Folksong-Notizen

  • [1979] Sir Robert Peel, having become Home Secretary in 1828 prepared a Metropolitan Police Bill, which became law the following year. This created a single police force in the London area (excepting the City) for the first time, and placed it under the direct control of the Home Secretary. [...] the new police later came to be known as 'Bobbies' or 'Peelers' [...]. (Palmer, Ballad History 103)

  • [1998:] Learned from Tim Lyons of Clare. I mistook the locale for years and didn't realise that there was another Bantry, in North Co. Wexford, where this love song from the Peninsular War comes from. (Jimmy Crowley, notes 'Uncorked!')

  • See also Mudcat.org
    Bawnoge

Quelle: Ireland

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03.04.2003, aktualisiert am 02.04.2010, 27.07.2003